Tag Archives: Flipped classroom

My two biggest drivers of web traffic: Jeremy Clarkson and ‘The Flipped Classroom’ !

12 Nov

SOME MORE CONSIDERED THOUGHTS ON THE FLIPPED CLASSROOM – THE NORMAL BLOG MATERIAL WILL RESUME SHORTLY !

In the three years that I’ve been using social media to further my teaching two things have driven more web traffic that any other. About a year ago I innocently replied to a tweet from an ex-student suggesting that Jeremy Clarkson might not be ‘a paragon of journalistic virtue’, and was deluged with some fairly abusive replies, and two weeks ago a blog post on ‘the flipped classroom’ produced a week and a half’s worth of web traffic in one day ! For those who have not come across it before, the flipped classroom is the fairly simple idea of asking students to consume material in advance of a particular class such that class time can be used for something more productive than the transmission of information.

I should confess at this point that I have always used blogging as a ‘quick and dirty’ means or recording what’s going on in my head at any particular moment, and thus what I write isn’t that deeply considered before it’s published. However, the responses to my post about the flipped classroom have made me think rather more deeply about the topic, and I’ve set these out below:

1) The first thing I’ve learnt is to be very careful with the language I use. I have the habit of referring to any session in which I am in a classroom with 200+ students as ‘a lecture’. However, having now read the literature than many correspondents sent me (including a huge meta-analysis of studies of ‘flipping’) ‘a lecture’ seems to be defines as ‘continuous exposition’ by an academic. I’ve always attempted to break up my teaching with material designed to encourage students to think about what I’ve said, and employ the skills I’m trying to impart, so I guess I don’t ‘lecture’. I’ll thus try to stick to ‘class’ and ‘teaching’ to replace ‘lecture’ and ‘lecturing’.

2) I maybe overly naive, but I find it depressing that any academic is still indulging in ‘continuous exposition’ as a teaching method, surely we’re all established by now that ‘deep’ processing of information is necessary for learning, and that’s hardly likely to happening if all that occurs in a class is the academic imparting information and the students writing it down frantically. That said, this seems to be to be more of an issue of ‘poor practice’ than necessarily a reason for ‘flipping’ a class.

3) Leading on from this is a point that was made by more than one correspondent, that learning is about ‘the construction of knowledge not the transmission of knowledge’, and by flipping the classroom you free up time for working on the ‘construction of knowledge’. Now, being a pedantic psychologist I’d argue that learning is about BOTH ‘the construction and the transmission of knowledge’, in that one would have little to construct if something first hadn’t been ‘transmitted’. One can, of course, argue about the weighting of these two components. Having thought about it a lot this week, I think that my real worry about the ‘flipped classroom’ is that whilst it seems an excellent method for facilitating the ‘construction of knowledge’ it may have neglected the idea that ‘transmission of knowledge’ needs to take place somewhere, and that the quality of that ‘transmission’ is important for the subsequent ‘construction’. Indeed, I wonder if in ‘flipping’ we aren’t, in some cases, abdicating responsibility for ‘transmission’ to textbook publishers. At a ‘Lecture Capture’ conference I attended recently the ‘Keynote’ speaker on ‘flipping’ had used lecture recordings from previous years as his vehicle for ‘transmission’. This suggests either that ‘lecturing’ IS a good vehicle for transmission or transmission is of vastly secondary importance.

It’s clear from the literature that, at least in STEM disciplines, flipping does improve academic performance but I wonder a little more focus was put on how best to facilitate ‘transmission’ this improvement might be even bigger.

My resolution for the next academic year is to try out ‘flipping’ a class, but to focus on how transmission will take place before I do so.

Is the ‘flipped classroom’ the answer to all our problems ?

27 Oct

flippedgraphic(web1100px)_0

Since the beginning of the summer I’ve been heavily involved in by institution’s introduction of a pilot of lecture capture technology. So far I’ve been hugely impressed by the software we’ve decided on from Panopto. This week I attended a conference run by Panopto at Senate House in London, and was intrigued to see that the debate had moved on from just recording all lectures to the concept of the ‘flipped classroom’. Whilst the idea goes back as far as Eric Mazur work in the 1990’s, it was in the early 2000’s that genuine discussion appeared of the idea pre-recording materials for students to watch before attending a teaching session. Indeed, the Learning & Teaching management of my own institution seem really keen that we move towards flipping our classes.

I’m genuinely torn as to whether the ‘flipped classroom’ is a good idea for me or not. I can well understand that if I were teaching Research Methods I would be rushing towards this approach, but for what I do, I still can’t decide whether it’s a good idea or not. I’ve always been a supporter of the ‘lecture’ as a  great way of demonstrating ‘the academic process’ to students, so hopefully the best of my lectures set out to make a specific point, and along the way use evidence as ‘scaffolding’ to get to that point. In my case it may well be that there are small chunks of my lectures that I could ‘flip’ in order to free up class time, rather than it being whole sessions. What I found interesting about the Panopto Conference I attended was that the speaker giving an example of a flipped classroom seemed equally as conflicted as I am. The big question surrounding ‘flipping’ seems to be ‘what do you do with the freed up class time’, and it was that point that seemed to be lacking from the conference presentation. (I should confess that my other fear is ‘What if they don’t all watch the flipped material before the teaching session?’)

I suspect I’ll give this a go next year on a small scale, but in the interim there are a range of examples I’m looking for :

1) Flipped classes in universities that are not highly selective

2) Flipped classes with cohorts of 200+ students

3) Flipped classes at 1st year (freshman) level, rather than final year

As an aside, for anyone considering lecture capture software, Panopto is an excellent solution. I’ve been very pleasantly surprised as to how robust the software is, and how easy it is to use.

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